close

  • Faithful to my Homeland, the Republic of Poland

     

  • NEWS

  • 15 June 2016

    To mark this anniversary Polish Ambassador Janusz Stańczyk, together with German Ambassador Gerhard Küntzle, opened in the Council of Europe, in the presence of Council’s Secretary General Thorbjørn Jagland, an exhibition “Poles and Germans. Stories of Dialogue”.

     

    The signing of the Treaty of Good Neighborship and Friendly Cooperation was made possible by the watershed changes in Europe of the year 1989, that brought Poland freedom and German unity. The constructive dialogue between Poland and Germany, started with the Reconciliation Mass in Krzyżowa on 12 November 1989, attended by the first non-communist Prime Minister of Poland, Tadeusz Mazowiecki, and the Chancellor of a unifying Germany, Helmut Kohl, paved the way for the German-Polish Border Treaty of 14 November 1990. Ultimate elimination of this most critical point of tension between Poland and Germany since the end of second world war made the real neighborship cooperation possible. The Treaty of Good Neighborship and Friendly Cooperation of 17 June 1991 opened a new era of Polish-German relations. This Treaty outlined the goals and areas of cooperation between the two countries, from security, politics, and economic relations to environmental protection and youth exchange programs. But most importantly, at its core, the Treaty testified to the common values and interests of Poland and Germany, despite a difficult history.

     

    On 8 June 2016, when  opening the exhibition “Poles and Germans. Stories of Dialogue” in the seat of the Council of Europe in Strasbourg, Ambassador Janusz Stańczyk  said: “I would like to encourage everyone to look at this exhibition, like I do, from a contemporary perspective. And I would like you to reflect on how a difficult starting point, respected and remembered as it is, may not block a bold journey into the future.” On the same note, Ambassador Gerhard Küntzle underlined: “Today our countries have the closest possible ties, socially, politically and culturally. This fact is nothing short of a miracle; it is a precious asset, and we should work to preserve it. (…) The friendship between Germany and Poland is a gift for which we are profoundly grateful.”

     

    Thorbjørn Jagland, the Secretary General of the CoE, followed by stressing that good neighborship between Poland and Germany is of particular importance for the unity of Europe and that Polish-German reconciliation is a good example of the reconciliation between nations, comparing it to the one between France and Germany.

    Photo: Council of Europe
    Photo: Council of Europe
    Photo: Council of Europe
    Photo: Council of Europe
    Photo: Council of Europe
    Photo: Council of Europe
    Photo: Council of Europe
    Photo: Council of Europe

    Print Print Share: